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Something a lot of people believe would help keep DRAM prices from falling is Micron's planned acquisition of the seven Hynix fabs, a move they predict would help keep DRAM capacity in check. Nobody can afford the breakage of this deal,” declares Charles Kau, EVP with Nanya Technology, a major supplier of double-data-rate memory.

SPC5748CK1MKU6_Datasheet PDF

Something a lot of people believe would help keep DRAM prices from falling is Micron's planned acquisition of the seven Hynix fabs, a move they predict would help keep DRAM capacity in check. Nobody can afford the breakage of this deal,” declares Charles Kau, EVP with Nanya Technology, a major supplier of double-data-rate memory.

The company's TXN13200 line of modules–which measures the size of a credit card, or about 3-by-2.2-inch–comes in two versions. The first version is geared for OC-192 SONET/SDH networks, while the other module is aimed for Ten Gigabit Ethernet protocols.

Both versions are equipped with Intel's LXT16784/85 serializer/deserializer chip set. The module itself runs at just 6.5 watts, which is 35% less than other transceivers on the market, according to Intel. It also complies with the 300-pin Multi-Source Agreement (MSA) standard.

SPC5748CK1MKU6_Datasheet PDF

Meanwhile, the other module, the TXN17401, also supports Ten Gigabit Ethernet applications. This module is based on the Xenpak” MSA packaging standard, which features a 70-pin electrical interface.

The TXN17401 will be priced below $1,000 in high volume. Pricing for the TXN13200 will be less than $2,000 in high volume. Samples are currently available.

SAN FRANCISCO — During the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) here this week, Intel Corp. plans to outline more details about its McKinley line of 64-bit microprocessors, but it will remain mum about another new 64-bit technology, code-named Yamhill.”

SPC5748CK1MKU6_Datasheet PDF

At ISSCC, Intel plans to give six separate papers on McKinley, a 1-GHz, 64-bit processor line for use in high-end servers. The company plans to outline some new features of the processor, including an integrated, Level 3 cache design that promises to boost the overall speeds of the device, according to Intel executives at a press event in San Francisco last week. The event was intended to preview the company's activities at ISSCC, which will be held in San Francisco this week.

Intel itself has been talking about McKinley for the last year and has been sampling the chip since early-2001 (see Aug. 28 story ). The processor is expected to compete against similar 64-bit chips from Advanced Micro Devices, IBM, MIPS, and Sun Microsystems, according to analysts.

SPC5748CK1MKU6_Datasheet PDF

McKinley is also the follow-on chip to Intel's current 64-bit processor–dubbed Itanium, which was co-developed by Intel and Hewlett-Packard Co. at a reported cost of $1 billion.

But the Itanium chip was two years late to the market, and so far, has been a disappointment in terms of sales for Intel, according to analysts. Now, system manufacturers are waiting for the new and improved McKinley processor for 64-bit computing applications (see May 25 story ).

In addition, the 802.11 specification itself gives mobile device designers considerable flexibility for implementing power management. While connected, the device can be placed in a power-saving sleep” or standby mode between beacons, those instants in time when the 802.11b subsystem looks for information from the wireless network's AP. Beacons are transmitted at precise intervals, 10 times per second for example, and are used by the WLAN to identify all network members, and to alert these stations when data is waiting to be transmitted to them. This ability for Wi-Fi devices to enter a sleep mode allows a major reduction in average power consumption.

Taking this concept a step further, the device does not have to be awake for every beacon. The 802.11 protocol allows the station to use a parameter called the Listen Interval to save additional power. The Listen Interval is a parameter sent to the access point during network connectivity. The use of longer Listen Intervals allows the device to miss a specific number of beacons, without losing any data traffic or disconnecting from the network.

Under this mechanism, the AP buffers data while the station is asleep and not listening. You could se the Listen Interval at 10, for example, so that the 802.11b subsystem would wake to listen to every tenth beacon. Therefore, when 10 beacons occur per second, the device would wake and listen once every second. The device's response time using this Listen Interval would not be perceptible to users. The system would function as if it were continuously connected to the WLAN. It is important to note, however, that the AP and network must be able to handle data-buffering requirements for all associated devices.

Two important factors affecting power consumption in a mobile 802.11b system are the rate at which data is transmitted between the AP and stations, and the range or distance supported by the device's 802.11b radio frequency (RF). Range has a more straightforward relationship with power than data rate. A designer can specify a desired range for the device and reduce the RF transmit power if shorter distances are acceptable. In certain applications, it's possible to remove or bypass the RF system's power amplifier altogether. Doing so would reduce transmit power consumption, but it would also limit the supported data rate to 1 or 2 Mbits/second.

The data rate has a more complex relation to power consumption. For example, one approach to reduce 802.11b power would be to restrict operation to lower data rates (which are less susceptible to interference), in combination with lower RF transmit power. The same usable range, or distance, for the device could be maintained with reduced transmit power because lower data rates are more tolerant of interference.

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